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they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
-fire. netanyahu said israel is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend itself. and egypt, which is brokering a deal between the two sides, cancelled a press conference where officials were expected to announce a deal with terms for a cease-fire. tomorrow, secretary clinton meets with the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a buildi
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
's going on with egypt, the united states annually gives roughly $2 billion to egypt and something that senator graham made clear over the weekend is to remind egypt everyone is watching their steps. >> egypt, watch what you do and how you do it. you're teetering with the congress on having your aid cut off if you keep inciting violence between the israelis and the palestinians. >> so is this a big test for morsi to prove not only that they are a partner to the united states, but an ally moving forward? >> well, they have been a treaty ally since '79. there's roughly $2 billion in aid given to egypt every year. $2 billion isn't quite what it used to be. so if this is the one piece of leverage that we have over egypt, that's not going to work. what we -- >> even in an economy that's totally failing and upside down for egypt, it's -- $2 billion is not an incentive to want to play nice? >> i don't think that it is the only factor that will get mohamed morsi to be an honest broker in the region. i think it's much -- it would be a much better bet to appeal to his sense of wanting to be
maceda, you were in cairo the announcement came from there. egypt is being given credit for having at least brokered this deal or godfathered this deal. what are the terms? do we know anything more about the terms of the cease-fire? >> well, we know that there was no formal agreement. that's the key thing here. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demands but need to work that out. >> stephanie gosk, you're in israel where we've experienced -- they've
leadership and leadership in egypt to try and come up with a truce, one that she describes as being durable. shannon? >> shannon: we'll talk more with the panel about that, david. thank you. the violence in the middle east is stealing thunder from president obama's asian visit and interrupting outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton's farewell tour. here is chief white house correspondent ed henry. >> secretary of state hillary clinton plunged right in to the last minute shuttle diplomacy. rushing from campodea to jerusalem. to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid. and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> after a short rest, clinton will now head to ramallah early wednesday to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm sw
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
to create a moral equivalency. i think a ground war is obviously going to test where is egypt, where is turkey. we know where iran is. they are arming the hamas, missiles or a lot of them seem to come out of iran. in essence, it seems to me that something pro joked by iran and encouraged by egypt and turkey by immediately taking the side of hamas which is extraordinary. >> greta: so, with hamas in order to get them to step down from its firing rockets into israel and doing provocative, take at hamas. why in the world they are going reach with truce. they are consumed with hatred toward israel. they were very tight and close to iran. today they identified six people who they felt were conspiring with the israelis. they executed them and dragged one body through the streets. they used civilians as shields. where in the world is if i do strike a temporary deal, why in the world would you ever think it would stick or hold? >> you would have to be totally unrealistic. the secretary-general's comments everybody should show restraint is absurd. if somebody lobbed 130 bombs on new york we wo
and breaking news. jon: there are massive protests in egypt right now against president mohammed morsi's latest power grab. as anger grows the muslim brotherhood announces plans for its own demonstration. >>> police combing a million dollar mansion for clues after a violent home invasion. >>> plus there is still time to try your luck as the powerball jackpot hit as record 500 million smackers. it is ail "happening now." jon: think if that half a billion buck is not enough to touch the national debt. jenna: i like when you say smackers. that gets us into the lottery. jon: day two of crucial meetings on capitol hill. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. susan rice is meeting with support bob corker of tennessee. she just wrapped up talks with susan collins of maine. that topic is benghazi. what did ambassador rice know about the terror attacks on the u.s. consulate that killed four americans on september 11? she faced a lot of criticism for comments made in the days following the attacks blaming it on a demonstration that got out of hand. by the way she wasn't the only one. that is something we h
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
. things are moving fast in egypt right now. we're going there to take you on the ride. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> he was the man of the hour, egypt's first democratically elected president. now morsi is being called aa would-be dictator and people are protesting. some are getting killed. massive crowds today at funeral of a protestor who died overnight fatally injured during demonstrations last week against morsi putting his decisions beyond judicial review. ever since he issued it the streets looked like this when millions rose to overthrow "the dictator" hosni mubarak. this it time they accuse him of a naked power grab. today he met with members of the highest judicial body and emerged saying it his edict was clarified. it remaining unclear. we have the late heest from cairo. this clari
egypt is expected to play a key role in brokering a truce and trying to maintain it. clarissa ward reports from caro this morning. >> reporter: good morning. >> we were expecting some type of announcement last night regarding a cease-fire. what happened? >> reporter: that's the million dollar question. everyone here in egypt was expecting for president morsi to make an announcement last night. they schedule ad time 9:00 p.m. local. the english language newspaper here has the headline as israel and gaza agree on a cease-fire. that's the level of confidence here that people felt that there was going to be a cease-fire agreement. now trying to determine why that agreement never happened is very difficult. obviously people on each side have different opinions. one official with the freedom and justice party which is the political wing of the muslim brotherhood told us the israelis requested to postpone the agreement for another day and she told us we would hear something later today. but at this stage nobody really knows. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is on her way to egypt. wh
to "early start." today a very important day in the middle east. particularly in egypt. delegations from both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to pick up as the day goes on, but some of the things that are working in new york's favor, the weath
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
have added on to that the arab spring, which gave us new leadership in egypt. how scary is this that mohammed morsi will be a source for good. >> clearly they have a right to defend themselves, and they have to protect their citizens. we have to remember the united states it's as if washington d.c. was being attacked from the state of maryland. it's very, very serious what's happening there. i think as far as the arab spring, clearly the environment has changed, and i think the united states now is looking to morsi so look to hamas to get them to stop shooting. hopefully you can take advantage of the negative situation and start talking about peace. >> president morsi has his own problems at home too in terms of trying to be tough on hamas, which, after all, is part of the muslim brotherhood and the palestinians. do you think he can be helpful? has he been helpful? >> i don't know that he has. clearly we've benefitted from almost 40 years now of having peace partners between israel and egypt even though the egyptian government never told the people of egypt how important
across egypt. we'll have the latest on that. then we'll take our annual turn to books. we'll talk about presidents past and present with the legendary bob woodward, whose latest is "the price of politics." historian doris kearns goodwin's "team of rivals" is the basis for the new "lincoln" movie. former "newsweek" editor evan thomas is the author of "ike's bluff." and jon meacham's new book is "thomas jefferson: the art of power." for fun, we'll explore the darker side of fiction with gillian flynn, author of the big bestseller, "gone girl." mystery writer david baldacci, whose new one is forgotten. david baldacci, author of "the expats," and then there is alex stone, whose "fooling houdini" tells how he chose magic over physics, and, yes, he fooled us and he'll fool you, too. how did you do that? we were all about books this morning, just like another washington shopper this weekend. >> we're going to get those. >> okay. >> schieffer: because this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
. appreciate it. [ sirens ] >>> new violence today in egypt. taking a look at this. protesters throwing rocks, police firing tear gas. fight for democracy intensifying there. cairo's tie rear square. grounds for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, se
erupt in egypt. thousands demonstrating against a controversial grab for power by mohammed morsi. many saying he's acting like a modern day pharaoh. a big republican turns his back on the grover norquist tax pledge. is the gop preparing to give in to the president? is and thousands of people packing into stores today. watch your wallet. we'll tell you how the shopping season is really adding up. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm tom foreman. egypt erupts. thousands of angry egyptians have been protesting in opposition to a controversial power grabby egypt's president. at least 80 people have been injured and one killed in clashes with police who fired tear gas into the crowds. the unrest began after he issued a series of orders which allow him to run the country unchecked until a new constitution is written. morsi says his actions are meant to speed up reform and achieve political and social stability. >> translator: i have said beforened i repeat again, that i would never use a legislation against individuals, parties, men, women or muslims or christians for personal ga
's go new to egypt where there's another political crisis brewing and some of it is taking place exactly where the arab spring started. got new video to share with you here of opponents demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed m
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
until 10:00 p.m. eastern tonight to buy that $2 ticket. >>> and overseas now to egypt, where opposition to president mohamed morsi is growing. for a third straight day, protesters hit the streets demanding he rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of t
through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we
of state hillary clinton is in egypt. earlier she met with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and prime minister netanyahu and had this to say. >> america's commitment to israel is rock solid and unwavering. the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities and towns must end and a broader calm restored. gregg: general jack keane is a four star general retired. general, great to see you. this is shuttle diplomacy. she has been in jerusalem, ramallah, now cairo. can a cease-fire be brokered here? >> i don't think she would be here unless they believed a cease-fire can be obtained. i also believe she is here because they had legitimate concerns about netanyahu going on the ground in gaza. >> what does hamas wants out of this? >> they want open borders, access to those borders in a way they don't have them now. they want the naval blockade removed. they want a significant improvement in trade. >> reporter: wouldn't that facilitate even more smuggling of rockets into gaza most of them made by iran. >> they are pushing them through africa, into the sinai, and that
at these pictures. cairo, egypt. thousands of people chanting. morsi, the president of that country, recently the stowed absolute powers among himself. about 60,000 people in the square. numbers reportedly growing. those pictures speaking for themselves. connell: day five out of those protests. right now, let's make you a little money. charles payne. dagen: what do you got? charles: i am driving down 151st street, a gigantic line of people all the way down the block. they were at the house of hoops. this is the most amazing sneaker store you have ever seen in your life. it turns out, footlocker owns it. this morning, goldman sachs put a pot on footlocker. i just wanted to reiterate it, they also have a woman's sneaker store. connell: whatever the newest sneaker was, i think it faded for a while, but now it is back. charles: my son is not into sports, but he knows these sneakers. when the new ones come out, he will let me know. just five minutes ago they were sold out on ebay. first of all, i am not going to get you these sneakers, your grades are not good enough and they cost too much. i do n
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
electedded muslim brotherhood leader of egypt is facing the same kind of revolt some would say in the streets. we'll keep a close eye on live developments in cairo. our thanks to steve harrigan, just several feet above that scene right now. bill: that is breaking and developing overseas. also back at home we're only minutes away from susan rice and her arrival on the hill. show you a live look where we expect the ambassador to arrive. she will sit down with her harshest critics who say she misled the american people on the attack in libya. we'll get reaction from the man who used to hold her job, former u.n. ambassador to the u.n., john bolton, is our guest next martha: all right. we've got a fox news alert because it is 9:30 on the east coast and there is senator kelly ayotte as she walks into a very important meeting this morning after a couple of months of controversy over this u.s. ambassador susan rice is about to face her toughest republican critics on benghazi. this is a live shot on the interiors and escalators of capitol hill this morning. ambassador rice will sit down with senators
funds. he says he is willing to begin peace negotiations. >> egypt's parliament, dominated by conservative muslims approved a new constitution early this morning. the assembly's more moderate members are crying foul. it is sparking another day of protests against president mohamed morsi. morsi's supporters plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on
tension in egypt this morning, among opponents of that country's president, mohamed morsi. things started getting rough on the streets of cairo, with protesters hurling molotov cocktails at police. they are seething about morsi's powers of placing himself beyond judicial review. a massive demonstration by morsi's opponent is planned for today. >>> we wanted you to check this out. from australia, early this morning. look at that. a crane, high above the streets of sydney caught fire. and then, the crane's arm falls on the roof of a nearby building. the rain operator escaped down a loader. no one was injured. the site was closed for a time. two weeks ago, concerns that diesel was leaking from the crane. the crane's owner also owns the crane in new york that collapsed during hurricane sandy. >> interesting there. >>> and speaking of sandy, one month after the month monster s the financial toll keeps growing. andrew cuomo says the repair for the state and new york city will top $32 billion. and the fallout continues at lipa, the long island utility company that's under fire for its slow respo
, and once again here's matt. >> savannah, thanks. turning overseas, violence is still raging in egypt over the president's power graham grab there. nbc eayman mohyeldin is in cairo with the latest on this. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, matt. a few days ago president morrisey of egypt was receiving praise from around the world including u.s. president barack obama for brokering that cease-fire and today he's coming under criticism that puts him in conflict with the top judges that. political fight is spilling over into the streets, claiming lives and plunging the country's economy into turmoil, and more importantly it is threatening the country's post-revolutionary progress. for a fourth straight night protest efforts attacked the offices of president mohamed morsi's freedom and justice party. the political wing of the muslim brotherhood. demonstrators are angry at president morsmorsi's latest decision, one that's reverting the country to a dictatorship. >> we want a contry of institutions, not symbolized in one person who makes all decisions and nobody can say no. >> repo
into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in order that people's voices would be heard and reckoned with and they are angry that his camp is in a very brazen way trying to silence that. morsi's decrees, they say, feel they are a sign of times to come. it
and rain returns on wednesday. >>> and that's your latest forecast. >> dylan, thanks. >>> now to egypt, where protests have erupted over president mohamed morsi's decree expanding his power. jim is in cairo. good morning. >> reporter: almost two years after their revolution, egyptians seem more divided than ever. after many hear their elected leader has driven the wedge deeper and wider. at dawn, there were more tents and protesters around tahrir square, but that didn't stop clashes with police, where protesters blocked traffic defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. >> translator: we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved. >> reporter: morsi told his supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast track a new constitution being written by a mostly islamist assembly, after which he said he'd give up those powers. yes, he might be a dictator for the time being, but these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament, he said. but the decrees h
as egypt takes the lead. [ male announcer ] introducing the new dell xps 12. part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ >>> welcome back, everyone. i'm alex witt. some of the stories making headline on thanksgiving day. a new study in the new england journal of medicine claims routine use of mammograms may have led to 1.3 million women being incorrectly diagnosed or overdiagnosed with breast cancer in the past 30 years. the latest study cast skepticism on the effectiveness of the test. one-third of women diagnosed with breast cancer would not have developed the full-blown disease if left untreated. >>> two weeks after winning his tenth term in congress, jesse jackson jr. resigned. jackson cited his ongoing treatment for bipolar disorder and admitted to, quote, my share of mistakes. jackson's resignation amid a committee vegs into dealings with impressined former governor blah voi given. >>> the violence in syria continues. rebel leaders say 40 people killed in an air strike on a key hospital in the city of aleppo. this is not the first time the
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
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